Thomas a Kempis

Living in the late fourteenth and much of the fifteenth century, Thomas a Kempis served as a copyist in the Mount St. Agnes monastery. Here, Thomas copied the Bible at least four times… by hand. He also contributed many works of his own writing, including The Imitation of Christ. An avid writer and reader, here’s a couple of contributions by him…

“Without the Way, there is no going, Without the Truth, there is no knowing, Without the Life, there is no living.”
“If thou wilt receive profit, read with humility, simplicity, and faith, and seek not at any time the fame of being learned.”
“At the Day of Judgement we shall not be asked what we have read, but what we have done.”

The Imitation of Christ, Book I, ch. 3
Advertisements

About mtsweat

Seeking the rest that is only promised and found in Christ Jesus, along with my treasured wife of more than twenty-five years, we seek to grow in our relationship with our Heavenly Father, walk with the Holy Spirit as He moves our hearts, loving others always as Jesus loves us, and carry the news of His glory, the wonderful gospel, that gives light and life where there once was only darkness.
This entry was posted in Quotes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Thomas a Kempis

  1. Cris says:

    A wise man, this Thomas a Kempis. I have heard many claim originality of your third quote by Kempis.

  2. writinggomer says:

    Great blog, these quotes are spot on!

  3. Steven Sawyer says:

    Love your “Who’s On First” blog about Christian church fellowship. I agree with you. And your blog has impacted me. At church when I glad hand in the lobby or between services, my questions now are, “How has God worked in your life this week?” or “Do you have anything you’d like me to pray about for you?” Thank you. And I hope you allow me to re-post Who’s On First, giving you credit, of course, and putting a link in the post back to Resting In His Grace. Let me know. Have a blessed weekend!

  4. granbee says:

    We ALL need to immerse ourselves in “The Imitation of Christ” as a companion to our Bibles! We need to sink deeply into mediation on these teachings in order to grow in the spirit in order to meet today’s challenges in victory!~

    • granbee I have to kindly disagree with you. We all need to meditate on the Bible’s teachings not a man’s. I read this little book in college and enjoyed it but it is not the end all and be all of books. It is just another decent work by a fellow believer. Get in the word and not the words of men.

      Travis (anotherchristianblog.org)

      • It seems strange that someone such as Travis would have a blog and then condemn men for reading other men’s writings. Then the question that has to be asked is, Why is Travis wasting time reading this blog, if he isnt supposed to read nothing but the Bible?

        Anyone who takes the approach Travis does in perusing other writer’s books, has rejected God’s gifts to men. Many of the theologians I read were or are Pastors. God has given the office of a Pastor to the church as a gift.

        Lastly when we do not.use other materials in our study of the Bible, then our theology is always warped because we do not know how to interpret certain scriptures because we dont know the geography, culture, circumstances, etc….that surrounded certain books that were written in the Bible.

        My original Pastor used to tell me what Travis declared. I am glad I did not listen to him because I would have never grown in knowledge, but would have remained in ignorance like him.

      • I think reformedontheweb didn’t understand what I was trying to say. granbee said, “We ALL need to immerse ourselves in “The Imitation of Christ” as a companion to our Bibles!” My point was that we should be immersed in the Word. I didn’t say, “We shouldn’t read any other works.” I didn’t say, “We can’t gain any other insights from other works.” I had a problem with the word “immerse”. I was not clear and that is my fault.

        As reformed people, which I am assuming you are reformed, we stand on the shoulders of giants. People such as Hus, Luther, Calvin are people that we all should read. But, I would not say we should be “immersed” in their works. Rather, we should allow their words to encourage us when it aligns with Scripture.

        Travis (anotherchristianblog.org)

  5. I have this exact book on my Kindle Mike. I read it every morning when I get up over coffee. Excellent book!

  6. Have been reading and meditating with this monk for years. Good source!

  7. literary lew says:

    Liked those quotes from a’ Kempis. I’ll have to read him again. It has been a long time.

  8. mtsweat says:

    Hey, Hershel. That is an interesting bit of info. Have to check that out. God bless, friend.

    • mtsweat says:

      No, I’m not losing it. And I’m not talking to myself. Hershel from over at Reformed on the Web added this interesting piece of info,

      “If I am not mistaken, it was a reading of this book by John Newton, which transformed his heart.”

      Not really sure what I did, but I lost his comment. Sorry, Hershel.

Comments are closed.